bard

  1. a lyric poet
  2. an ornamental caparison for a horse

Bard

Type: Term Pronunciation: bahrd Definitions: 1. Philip, U.S. physiologist, 1898-1945. See: Cannon-Bard theory
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=9484

Bard

To wrap meat with bacon or salt pork.
Found on http://www.chowbaby.com/10_2000/glossary/glossary.html?synchpage=3&Z=750170

Bard

Originally a term for a Celtic minstrel poet e.g. Cacofnix in Asterix the Gaul but is now used for any admired poet. Shakespeare is often referred to as 'the bard of Avon'.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

bard

[n] - a lyric poet 2. [n] - an ornamental caparison for a horse
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=bard

Bard

Bard (bärd) noun [ Of Celtic origin; confer W. bardd , Arm. barz , Ir. & Gael. bard , and French barde .] 1. A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes an...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/14

Bard

Bard transitive verb (Cookery) To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/14

bard

1. The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind. ... 2. Specifically, Peruvian bark. Bark bed. See Bark stove (below). Bark pit, a pit filled with bark and water, in which hides are steeped in tanning. ... <botany> Bark stove, a glazed structure for keeping tropical plants, having a bed of tanner's bark (called a bark b...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?bard

bard

noun an ornamental caparison for a horse
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bard

bard

noun a lyric poet
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bard

Bard

• (n.) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind. • (n.) A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men. • (n.) Specifically, Peruvian bark. • (n.) Alt. of Barde • (n.) Hence: A...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/bard/

bard

a poet, especially one who writes impassioned, lyrical, or epic verse. Bards were originally Celtic composers of eulogy and satire; the word came to ... [9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/21

Bard

Bard is a Celtic boy name. The meaning of the name is `Minstrel; a singer-poet.` The name Bard doesn`t appear In the US top 1000 most common names over de last 128 years. The name Bard seems to be unique!
Found on http://www.pregnology.com/index.php?boys/Bard

bard

bard (BAHRD) 1. Poet-singer, epic poet, poet: The Homeric poems were composed and sung by bards. 'This word is based on an ancient-Celtic order of singing poets who were reputed to have composed and recited verses on the legends and history of their tribes.' 2. Narrative poet, writer, rhymer, minstrel: 'A local bard read his poetry to the...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3537/

bard

originally a Celtic name for a poet-singer.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

bard

bard, in Wales, term originally used to refer to the order of minstrel-poets who composed and recited the poems that celebrated the feats of Celtic chieftains and warriors. The term bard in present-day usage has become synonymous with poet, particularly a revered poet.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0806168.html

Bard

A bard was a Celtic poet.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXB.HTM

Bard

A bard was an order of druid. The bard's office was to supervise, regulate and to lead. His robe was sky blue, symbolising justice and truth.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/D3.HTM

Bard

Bard is a cultivated variety of potato.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QB.HTM

bard

Celtic minstrel who, in addition to composing songs, usually at a court, often held important political posts. Originating in the pre-Christian era, bards were persecuted in Wales during the 13th century on political grounds. Since the 19th century annual meetings and competitions in Wales – known as eisteddfod – have attempted to rev...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0042480.html

Bard

a poet or singer. A term of contempt among the Scots, who considered them to be itinerant troublemakers, but a term of great respect among the Welsh.
Found on http://tudorswiki.sho.com/page/Tudor+Words+Glossary

Bard

[disambiguation] A bard is a minstrel in medieval Scottish, Irish and Welsh societies; and later re-used by romantic writers. Bard, The Bard or Bård may also refer to: == People == ==Fictional characters == ==Places== ==Music== ==Literature== ==In role-playing games== ==Schools== ==Other uses== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bard_(disambiguation)

Bard

[Soviet Union] The term bard (`бард` bard) came to be used in the Soviet Union in the early 1960s, and continues to be used in Russia today, to refer to singer-songwriters who wrote songs outside the Soviet establishment, similarly to beatnik folk singers of the United States. Because in bard music songwriters perform their own songs, t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bard_(Soviet_Union)

Bard

In medieval Gaelic and British culture, a bard was a professional poet, employed by a patron, such as a monarch or nobleman, to commemorate the patron`s ancestors and to praise the patron`s own activities. Originally a specific class of poet, contrasting with another class known as fili in Ireland and Highland Scotland, the term `bard`, with t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bard

Bard

(Welsh Bardd, Irish Bard) (1) An ancient Celtic poet, singer and harpist who recited heroic poems by
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385
No exact match found