Barge

Barge is Black-American slang for to jump
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZB.HTM

barge

[n] - a flatbottom boat for carrying heavy loads (especially on canals) 2. [v] - push one`s way 3. [v] - transport by barge on a body of water
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=barge

Barge

A vessel carrying oil usually on rivers - containing between 8,000 to 50,000 bbl or weighing 1,000 to 10,000mt. In the US, barges can be up to 100,000 bbl, and some barges can even exceed this.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Barge

NATO codename for Tupolev Tu-85 bomber [SU;RU]
Found on http://www.jedsite.info/index.html

Barge

Horizontal beam rafter that supports shorter rafters.
Found on http://www.rookinspections.com/glossary/glossaryb.shtml

Barge

Barge noun [ Old French barge , French berge , from Late Latin barca , for barica (not found), probably from Latin baris an Egyptian rowboat, from Greek ... , probably from Egyptian: confer Coptic bari a boat. Confer Bark a vessel.] 1.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/15

barge

1. A pleasure boat; a vessel or boat of state, elegantly furnished and decorated. ... 2. A large, roomy boat for the conveyance of passengers or goods; as, a ship's barge; a charcoal barge. ... 3. A large boat used by flag officers. ... 4. A double-decked passenger or freight vessel, towed by a steamboat. ... 5. A large omnibus used for excursions.
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?barge

barge

flatboat noun a flatbottom boat for carrying heavy loads (especially on canals)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=barge

barge

thrust ahead verb push one`s way; `she barged into the meeting room`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=barge

Barge

• (n.) A pleasure boat; a vessel or boat of state, elegantly furnished and decorated. • (n.) A large boat used by flag officers. • (n.) A double-decked passenger or freight vessel, towed by a steamboat. • (n.) A large omnibus used for excursions. • (n.) A large, roomy boat for the conveyance of passengers or goods; as, a sh
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/barge/

barge

(from the article `boxing`) ...changes in rules and by relocation to more lenient environments. Matches were frequently held in remote backwaters and were not openly publicized ... Steam, and later diesel, tugs improved speed of travel, particularly where lakes or estuarial lengths were encountered. Powered barges, towing one or ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/21

Barge

A barge is a type of long narrow flat bottomed boat.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RB.HTM

Barge

Barge is Black-American slang for to jump
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZB.HTM

Barge

A vessel carrying oil usually on rivers - containing between 8,000 to 50,000 bbl or weighing 1,000 to 10,000mt. In the US, barges can be up to 100,000 bbl, and some are even a bit larger.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21049

Barge

- Horizontal beam rafter that supports shorter rafters.
Found on http://www.homebuildingmanual.com/Glossary.htm

barge

an informal unit of volume used in the U.S. energy industry. The barges used on American rivers customarily carry about 25 000 barrels of oil (see barrel below). This is equivalent to 1.05 million gallons, roughly 1400 register tons, or about 3975 cubic meters.
Found on http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictB.html

barge

barge, large boat, generally flat-bottomed, used for transporting goods. Most barges on inland waterways are towed, but some river barges are self-propelled. There are also sailing barges. On the Great Lakes and in the American coastal trade, huge steel barges are used for transporting bulk cargoes ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0806187.html

BARGE

Flat bottomed boat designed to carry cargo on inland waterways,usually without engines or crew accommodations. Barges can be lashed together and either pushed or pulled by tugs, carrying cargo of 60,000 tons or more. Small barges for carrying cargo between ship and shore are known as lighters.
Found on http://www.insurexchange.com/glossary/maritime.htm

BARGE

BARGE, the Big August Rec.Gambling Excursion, is a yearly convention held in Las Vegas during the first weekend of August. It consists of a series of tournaments both of poker and other gambling games, as well as a banquet and a host of informal social and gambling activities organized by attendees. Some of the well-known poker players who have pa
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BARGE

Barge

A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. Some barges are not self-propelled and need to be towed or pushed by towboats. Canal barges, towed by draft animals on an adjacent towpath, contended with the railway in the early industrial revolution, but were outcompeted in the carriage of high-value ite
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barge

Barge

Horizontal beam rafter that supports shorter rafters.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Business/Construction/

BARGE

Flat-bottomed boat for carrying cargo on protected waterways, usually without engines or crew accommodations. On inland river systems barges can be lashed together and either pushed or pulled by tugs and handle cargo of 60,000 tonnes or more. Small barges for carrying cargo between ship and shore are known as lighters.
Found on http://ports.co.za/maritime-terms.php

barge

A large, flat-bottomed boat used to carry cargo from a port to shallow-draft waterways. Barges have no locomotion and are pushed by towboats. A single, standard barge can hold 1,500 tons of cargo or as much as either 15 railroad cars or 60 trucks can carry. A barge is 200 feet long, 35 feet wide and has a draft of 9 feet. Barges carry dry bulk (gra
Found on http://www.aapa-ports.org/Industry/content.cfm?ItemNumber=930

barge

A large, flat-bottomed boat used to carry cargo from a port to shallow-draft waterways. Barges have no locomotion and are pushed by towboats. A single, standard barge can hold 1,500 tons of cargo or as much as either 15 railroad cars or 60 trucks can carry. A barge is 200 feet long, 35 feet wide and has a draft of 9 feet. Barges carry dry bulk (gra
Found on http://www.aapa-ports.org/Industry/content.cfm?ItemNumber=930

barge

A large, flat-bottomed boat used to carry cargo from a port to shallow-draft waterways. Barges have no locomotion and are pushed by towboats. A single, standard barge can hold 1,500 tons of cargo or as much as either 15 railroad cars or 60 trucks can carry. A barge is 200 feet long, 35 feet wide and has a draft of 9 feet. Barges carry dry bulk (gra
Found on http://www.aapa-ports.org/Industry/content.cfm?ItemNumber=930
No exact match found