Aurora

A glow in the Earth's ionosphere caused by the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and charged particles from the Sun (The Solar Wind). It gives rise to the 'Northern Lights', or Aurora Borealis, in the Northern Hemisphere, and the Aurora Australis in the Southern Hemisphere.

Aurora

A faint visual phenomenon associated with geomagnetic activity, which occurs mainly in the high-latitude night sky; typical auroras are 100 to 250 km above the ground.

Aurora

[sculpture] Aurora is a public artwork by American artist Mark di Suvero. It is in the collection of the National Gallery of Art and on display at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., United States. Aurora consists of 8 tons of steel, resting on three diagonal supports. Certain `linear elements converge within a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(sculpture)

Aurora

[telenovela] Aurora is a Spanish language telenovela produced by the United States-based television network Telemundo. It starred Sara Maldonado, Eugenio Siller, and Jorge Luis Pila. As part of the 2010-2011 season, Telemundo aired the serial from November 1, 2010 to May 20, 2011 weeknights at 8pm/7c central, replacing El Clon. As with most...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(telenovela)

Aurora

[opera] Aurora is an opera in three acts by the Argentine composer Héctor Panizza (also known as Ettore Panizza) set to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Hector Quesada. Composed in 1907, Aurora became the second national opera of Argentina, after Felipe Boero`s more popular El Matrero. Although its plot is set in Argentina, Aurora i...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(opera)

Aurora

HMS Aurora was a British improved Arethusa Class cruiser of 5220 tons displacement launched in 1934. HMS Aurora carried a crew of 450 and was powered by four Admiralty 3-drum type oil fuelled boilers providing a top speed of 32 knots. Armaments consisted of six 6-inch guns; eight 4-inch anti-aircraft guns; two 3-pdr guns and seven smaller guns and ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RAA.HTM

Aurora

[newspaper] Aurora, until December 1927 known as Ystads-Bladet Aurora, was a daily Social Democratic newspaper published from Ystad in southern Sweden. As of 1957, the newspaper had a daily circulation of around 4,730. Editors of the newspaper included J. Pihlman, Elias Nilsson, Ludvig Törnqvist and Henry Hallgren. The first issue of Auror...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(newspaper)

Aurora

[literary journal] Aurora was a literary journal founded by Károly Kisfaludy in 1821-2. It was crucial in the development of Romanticism in Hungarian literature, and in establishing Pest as a literary centre. Kisfaludy began collecting contributions in 1820, but it was not until the autumn of 1821 that the first issue appeared (bearing the...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(literary_journal)

Aurora

[operating system] Aurora (formerly named Eeebuntu) (not to be confused with EasyPeasy, formerly known as Ubuntu Eee) is an operating system for netbooks. The current version is based on Ubuntu, though newer versions will be based on Debian Unstable. Eeebuntu was designed originally for the Asus Eee PC line of netbooks. Four versions are av...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(operating_system)

aurora

A glow in a planet's ionosphere caused by the interaction between the planet's magnetic field and charged particles from the Sun.
Found on http://www.solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

Aurora

(Latin) dawn; this word is the same as the name of a goddess of the Dawn in Roman mythology.
Found on http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/glossary/glossaryi.html

Aurora

A colorful, rapidly varying glow in the sky caused by the collision of charged particles in the magnetosphere with atoms in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Auroras are most often observed at high latitudes and are enhanced during geomagnetic storms.
Found on http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/sftheory/glossary.htm

Aurora

[n] - an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands of light caused by charged solar particles following the earth`s magnetic lines of force 2. [n] - goddess of the dawn
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Aurora

Aurora

'Polar lights' which occur in the Earth's upper atmosphere, caused by particles emitted by the Sun causing gas molecules in Earth's atmosphere to glow. Aurora Borealis are seen above the North Pole, Aurora Australis above the South.
Found on http://www.delscope.demon.co.uk/astronomy/glossary.htm

Aurora

aka Northern Lights - The different coloured lights which are visible at night above the Earth's poles.
Found on http://www.solarspace.co.uk/Glossary.php

Aurora

A faint visual phenomenon associated with geomagnetic activity,which occurs mainly in the high-latitude night sky; typical auroras are 100 to 250 kmabove the ground.The name comes from an older one, 'aurora borealis' (Latin for 'northern dawn') given because an aurora near the northern horizon (its usual location when seen in most of Europe) looks ...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/a/u/aurora/source.html

Aurora

In Roman mythology, goddess of the dawn (Greek Eos). Preceded by her sons, the fresh morning winds, she would fly or drive a chariot across the sky to announce the approach of Apollo's chariot...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Aurora

Au·ro'ra noun ; plural English Auroras Latin (rarely used) Auroræ [ Latin aurora , for ausosa , akin to Greek ..., ..., dawn, Sanskrit ushas , and English east .] 1. The rising light of the morning; the dawn of day; the redness of the sky ju...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/147

aurora

Origin: L. Aurora, for ausosa, akin to Gr, dawn, Skr. Ushas, and E. East. ... 1. The rising light of the morning; the dawn of day; the redness of the sky just before the sun rises. ... 2. The rise, dawn, or beginning. ... 3. The Roman personification of the dawn of day; the goddess of the morning. The poets represented her a rising out of the ocean...
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?aurora

Aurora

noun (Roman mythology) goddess of the dawn; counterpart of Greek Eos
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=Aurora

aurora

noun an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands of light caused by charged solar particles following the earth`s magnetic lines of force
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=aurora

Aurora

• (n.) A species of crowfoot. • (n.) The rising light of the morning; the dawn of day; the redness of the sky just before the sun rises. • (n.) The rise, dawn, or beginning. • (n.) The aurora borealis or aurora australis (northern or southern lights). • (n.) The Roman personification of the dawn of day; the goddess of the m...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/aurora/

Aurora

(from the article `Guercino, Il`) In 1621 Guercino went to Rome, where he played an important role in the evolution of Roman High Baroque art. Among many other commissions, he ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/125

Aurora

(from the article `Kisfaludy, Károly`) ...Suitors`). He stepped into the literary leadership left vacant by Ferenc Kazinczy`s gradual withdrawal from his active career, and, in 1822, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/125

Aurora

(from the article `Böhme, Jakob`) Germinating for several years, the insight led him to commit his thoughts to paper, at first for his own use. The manuscript was entitled Aurora, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/125
No exact match found