Aromatherapy

Method by which essential oils (natural oils taken from aromatic plants) are used to enhance health and also affect a person`s emotional well-being. The oils may be used in massage, inhalation, bath products and perfumes.
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Aromatherapy

Therapy involving the use of essential plant oils, generally in combination with massage, to treat a range of conditions.
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Aromatherapy

Uses essential oils extracted from nature`s herbs and flowers. The aroma is inhaled, or applied to the skin, and each of the oils (or combination thereof) addresses a specific disorder. It appears that the body is able to utilize the healing properties of the oils through the olfactory system of the body, and so initiate the healing process. Aroma
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Aromatherapy

Gentle massage using natural oils from flowers, roots and leaves. Often used as a relaxation aid.
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Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy: A form of alternative and complimentary medicine based on the use of very concentrated 'essential' oils from the flowers, leaves, bark, branches, rind or roots of plants with purported healing properties. In aromatherapy these potent oils are mixed with a carrier (usually soybean or almond oil) or the oils are diluted with alcohol or
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Aromatherapy

A complementary therapy that uses essential oils prepared from plant. Each essential oil has different properties. Some are stimulating and some have specific healing properties. They are often used in massage and can be used at home in the bath, in special oil burners or as inhalations.
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aromatherapy

The use of fragrances and essences from plants to affect or alter a person's mood or behaviour and to facilitate physical, mental, and emotional well-being. The chemicals comprising essential oils in plants has a host of therapeutic properties and has been used historically in africa, asia, and india. Its greatest application is in the field of alt
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aromatherapy

(ә-ro´mә-ther″ә-pe) the therapeutic use of essential oils extracted from plants by steam distillation or expression; they may be used by inhalation, introduced internally (orally, rectally, or intravaginally), or applied topically by means of compresses, baths, or massage.
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aromatherapy

aromatherapy A term used for treatment of illness and maintenance of general physical health using essential oils distilled from such plants as camomile, camphor, peppermint, rosemary, lavender, and eucalyptus. Such treatments were known in ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, and other civilizations, while early Arabian physicians developed the distillat
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Aromatherapy

The use of fragrance or essences from plants to alter a person's mental or emotional well being. Aromatherapy ingredients provide calming, soothing, invigorating and stimulating effects. Because some aromas can be hazardous, aromatherapy during pregnancy should be avoided.
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aromatherapy

In alternative medicine, use of oils and essences derived from plants, flowers, and wood resins. Bactericidal properties and beneficial effects upon physiological functions are attributed to the oils, which are sometimes ingested but generally massaged into the skin. Aromatherapy was first used in ancient Greece and Egypt, but became a forgotten ar
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Aromatherapy

The use of fragrance or essences from plants to alter a person's mental or emotional well being.
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Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy involves the use of therapeutic oils derived from plants to stimulate the body's nerves to help a person feel either more relaxed or energised. It is often used with massage or in the bath. Various oils are available and are divided into different fragrance families: relax, body, energy, mind and soul.
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Aromatherapy

A complementary therapy based on the healing properties of essential plant oils. The oils are usually massaged into the body, but they can be inhaled, used on a bath or in a cold compress placed next to the skin. See aromatherapy section.
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aromatherapy

A type of complementary and alternative medicine that uses plant oils that give off strong pleasant aromas (smells) to promote relaxation, a sense of well-being, and healing.
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Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy is a form of alternative medicine that uses volatile plant materials, known as essential oils, and other aromatic compounds for the purpose of altering a person`s mind, mood, cognitive function or health. Some essential oils such as tea tree have demonstrated anti-microbial effects, but there is still a lack of clinical evidence demo.
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Aromatherapy

the use of selected fragrances in lotions and inhalants in an effort to affect mood and promote health.
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Aromatherapy

massage is a soothing scented massage using essential oils extracted from plants that are known for their healing properties.
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Aromatherapy

Scented oils that are used to heal body, mind, and spirit. Most experts advise caution when using aromatherapy during pregnancy, since some aromas in a concentrated form can be hazardous.
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Aromatherapy

The use of essential oils (extracted from herbs, flowers, resin, woods, and roots) in body and skin
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