Antonomasia

Antonomasia: 1. The substitution of a title for a proper name, as in addressing a physician as 'Doctor' or a nurse as 'Nurse.' 2. The substitution of a personal name for a noun to designate a member of a group or class, as in calling a geneticist a Mendelist (after Gregor Mendel, who discovered the principles of inheritance). The word antonomasia i...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=34031

Antonomasia

An`to·no·ma'si·a noun [ Latin , from Greek ..., from ... to name instead; ... + ... to name, ... name.] (Rhet.) The use of some epithet or the name of some office, dignity, or the like, instead of the proper name of the person; as when his majesty is used for a king, or when, inste...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/99

antonomasia

The use of some epithet or the name of some office, dignity, or the like, instead of the proper name of the person; as when his majesty is used for a king, or when, instead of Aristotle, we say, the philosopher; or, conversely, the use of a proper name instead of an appellative, as when a wise man is called a Solomon, or an eminent orator a Cicero....
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?antonomasia

Antonomasia

• (n.) The use of some epithet or the name of some office, dignity, or the like, instead of the proper name of the person; as when his majesty is used for a king, or when, instead of Aristotle, we say, the philosopher; or, conversely, the use of a proper name instead of an appellative, as when a wise man is called a Solomon, or an eminent orat...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/antonomasia/

antonomasia

a figure of speech in which some defining word or phrase is substituted for a person`s proper name (for example, `the Bard of Avon` for William ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/85

antonomasia

antonomasia 1. The use of a title or formal description such as “Your Highness” or “His Excellency” in place of someone’s proper name. 2. The use of a proper name as a common noun to refer to someone or something with associated characteristics, e.g., in calling a handsome young man “an adonis”.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1478/

antonomasia

using an epithet or a title in place of a proper name.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Antonomasia

In rhetoric, antonomasia is the use of the name of some office, dignity, profession, science, or trade instead of the true name of the person, as when his majesty is used for a king, his lordship for a nobleman; or when, instead of Aristotle, we say, the philosopher; or, conversely, the use of a proper noun instead of a common noun; as, a Solomon f...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AA1.HTM

Antonomasia

In rhetoric, antonomasia is a substitution of any epithet or phrase for a proper name, such as `the little corporal` for Napoleon I. The reverse process is also sometimes called antonomasia. The word derives from the Greek ἀντονομασία, antonomasia, itself from the verb ἀντονομάζειν, antonomazein, meaning `to name differ......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonomasia

Antonomasia

Using an epithet or a title in place of a proper name.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

antonomasia

use of descriptive phrase or epithet instead of proper name
Found on http://phrontistery.info/a.html
No exact match found