amino acids

Organic acids carrying amino groups. The L-forms of about 20 common amino acids are the components from which proteins are made. See Table A2, and Table C5 for the codonassignment.

Amino Acids

The fundamental constituent of protein, it has both an acid and a basal function.

amino acids

(Humans as organisms) complex molecules which form the building-blocks of proteins

amino acids

Long chains of amino acids make up proteins. About 20 are known. Some amino acids are made in the body; those that are not are called essential amino acids and must be supplied in food.

Amino acids

Basic structural unit of proteins
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Amino acids

building blocks of proteins containing a carboxyl group (COOH) and an amino group(NH2) both attached to the same carbon atom . The difference between the 20 common amino acids lies in the nature of a side chain the 'R' group. Each amino acid, has a code of three adjacent nucleotides on the DNA molecule. Amino acids are joined together by peptide bo...
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Amino Acids

Twenty- two basic building blocks of the body that make up proteins.
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Amino Acids

Organic acids containing nitrogen. Proteins are made up of long chains of amino acids joined by peptide bonds. The body must be supplied with amino acids in the diet. There are 20 different types of amino acids in proteins of living origin. 'Non-essential' amino acids are necessary for body function but can be produced in the body by interconversio...
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Amino acids

A group of 20 different kinds of small molecules that link together in long chains to form proteins. Often referred to as the 'building blocks' of proteins. The sequence of amino acids in a protein determines the structure and function of the protein.
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amino acids

Amino acids are compounds containing both a carboxylic acid group (-COOH) and an amino group (-NH2 ). The most important are the a-amino acids, in which the -NH2 group in attached to the C atom adjacent to the -COOH group. In the ß-amino acids, there is an intervening carbon atom.
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Amino acids

The building blocks of proteins - proteins are made of long chains of amino acids joined together.
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amino acids

Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen compounds the composition of which are determined by genes
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Amino acids

Amino acids: The building blocks of polypeptides and proteins.
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Amino acids

the body's 'building blocks', what proteins are made of. They are used to smooth and strengthen the skin.
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amino acids

Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-nh2) and a carboxyl (-cooh) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerised to form proteins. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
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amino acids

The chemical subunits of polypeptides and proteins, and therefore one of the fundamental building blocks of life as we know it. An amino acid consists of a central carbon atom attached to a carboxyl group (–COOH), an amino group (–NH2), a hydrogen atom, and a side ...
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Amino Acids

Substances or compounds that act as building blocks in the developing embryo and fetus during prenatal development.
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Amino acids

Substances that make up proteins.
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Amino acids

The essential building blocks of Proteins, nine of which cannot be manufactured by the body and therefor have to be obtained through food intake.
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amino acids

Building blocks of proteins. Certain amino acids, called essential, must be obtained from the diet because the body does not produce them.
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Amino Acids

An essential building block of protein, being comprised of an organic acid containing an amine group (NH2).
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AMINO ACIDS

Nitrogen-containing molecules that form the structural backbone of proteins. All amino acids contain both an amino group (NH2) and a carboxyl group (COOH).
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Amino acids

A group of 20 different kinds of small molecules that link together in long chains to form proteins. Often referred to as the "building blocks" of proteins. The sequence of amino acids in a protein determines the structure and function of the protein.
Found on http://www.combichemistry.com/medical-chemistry-glossary.html

Amino Acids

Produced by the fermenting action of the yeast the amino acids give the sake its depth of flavour. They contribute to the level of umami in sake which can affect how dry or sweet a sake is perceived to be. Most sake fall between a range of 0.8 and 1.2. Those at the lower end of the scale are usually more elegant and delicate; those at the higher en...
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Amino acids

The essential building blocks of Proteins, nine of which cannot be manufactured by the body and therefor have to be obtained through food intake.
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