aluminium

Very light, silver-coloured metal discovered in 1827. From the 1850s it was occsionally used for figurinesand plaques, and sometimes combined with gold for bracelets. Aluminium was back in fashion from the early 1920s onwards for ART DECO cocktail equipment, cigarette collectables such as ashtrays, and useful household articles such as jelly moulds …...

Aluminium

A metal used for carrying electricity because it is light and a good electrical conductor.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20442

Aluminium

Aluminium is the basis for a number of alloys.
Found on http://www.hobbyshed.co.uk/model_kit_modelmaking_guides_glossary_abcd.htm

Aluminium

Aluminium and its alloys are widely used for various applications including aircraft assemblies and engine parts. It is a silvery white reactive metal which is usually covered in oxide, making it inert to acids, but it is attacked by alkalies. It is extracted from the hydrated oxide, Bauxite, by electrolysis of the oxide dissolved in molten sodium ...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/a/l/aluminium/source.html

Aluminium

A soft, silver coloured metal commonly used as an engraving material for printing plates. Anodised aluminium has been electroplated with an aluminium oxide coating, which gives it a hard, durable surface.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Aluminium

This light, silvery, metal is relatively resistant to corrosion, except in salty environments. It is sometimes used to make gutters and downpipes. In sheet form it is occasionally used for ridging, but its lightness makes it vulnerable to high winds.
Found on http://www.maintainyourchurch.org.uk/ToolkitModules/Toolkit1Glossary/tabid/

Aluminium

Al`u·min'i·um (ăl`u*mĭn'ĭ*ŭm) noun [ Latin alumen . See Alum .] (Chemistry) The metallic base of alumina. This metal is white, but with a bluish tinge, and is remarkable for its resistance to oxidation, and for its lightness, having a specific gravity of a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/64

aluminium

<chemistry, element> The metallic base of alumina. This metal is white, but with a bluish tinge, and is remarkable for its resistance to oxidation, and for its lightness, pertaining a specific gravity of about 2.6. ... Aluminium bronze or gold, a pale gold-coloured alloy of aluminium and copper, used for journal bearings, etc. ... Atomic weig...
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Aluminium

Light metal with chemical symbol Al. Also coin metal since the end of the First World War.
Found on http://www.austrian-mint.com/5

Aluminium

• (n.) The metallic base of alumina. This metal is white, but with a bluish tinge, and is remarkable for its resistance to oxidation, and for its lightness, having a specific gravity of about 2.6. Atomic weight 27.08. Symbol Al.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/aluminium/

aluminium

aluminium This spelling is used widely throughout the world, and was used in the United States before 1927 where the preferred spelling is now: aluminum.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2222/

Aluminium

Aluminium is a bluish-silver-white, malleable, ductile, light, trivalent metallic element with good electrical and thermal conductivity, high reflectivity, and resistance to oxidation and is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust occurring always in combination. It has the symbol Al. Aluminium was discovered in 1827, but nowhere found native,...
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aluminium

Lightweight, silver-white, ductile and malleable, metallic element, atomic number 13, relative atomic mass 26.9815, melting point 658°C/1,216°F. It is the third most abundant element (and the most abundant metal) in the Earth's crust, of which it makes up about 8.1% by mass....
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0009899.html

Aluminium

[disambiguation] Aluminium may also refer to: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium_(disambiguation)

Aluminium

In 2005, the People`s Republic of China was the top producer of aluminium with almost a one-fifth world share, followed by Russia, Canada, and the USA, reports the British Geological Survey. Over the last 50 years, Australia has become the world`s top producer of bauxite ore and a major producer and exporter of alumina (before being overtaken by.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium
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