Allotropy

Certain chemical elements have the ability to exist in two or more different structural forms known as allotropes. These allotropes may possess different physical properties such as density and melting points. Allotropic elements include carbon, tin, phosphorus and sulphur. Each allotrope is stable within a certain range of temperature and pressure only, and under certain conditions an allotrope can be converted into another. ...

Allotropy

Allotropes are different forms of the same element that exist in the same physical state.
Examples are: oxygen and ozone, rhombic sulphur and monoclinic sulphur, diamond and graphite. Such elements are said to show allotropy, and the various different forms are termed allotropes. In the case of diamond and graphite (and the Fullerenes, the most ...
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allotropy

[n] - the phenomenon of an element existing in two or more physical forms
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Allotropy

Allotropy is the reversible phenomenon by which certain metals may exist in more than one crystal structure. If the process is not reversible, the phenomenon is termed 'polymorphism.'Generally an elemental solid.Examplegraphite and diamond are allotropes of carbon.
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allotropy

Allotropy is the occurrence of an element in two or more crystalline forms.
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Allotropy

Certain chemical elements have the ability to exist in two or more different structural forms known as allotropes. These allotropes may possess different physical properties such as density and melting points. Allotropic elements include carbon, tin, phos
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/101-Allotropy

allotropy

<chemistry> The property of existing in two or more conditions which are distinct in their physical or chemical relations. ... Thus, carbon occurs crystallized in octahedrons and other related forms, in a state of extreme hardness, in the diamond; it occurs in hexagonal forms, and of little hardness, in black lead; and again occurs in a third...
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allotropy

allotropism noun the phenomenon of an element existing in two or more physical forms
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allotropy

(ә-lot´rә-pe) allotropism.
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Allotropy

• (n.) The property of existing in two or more conditions which are distinct in their physical or chemical relations.
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allotropy

the existence of a chemical element in two or more forms, which may differ in the arrangement of atoms in crystalline solids or in the occurrence of ... [7 related articles]
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allotropy

allotropy, allotropism 1. The existence of a solid substance in different physical forms. Tin, for example, has metallic and non-metallic crystalline forms. Carbon has two crystalline allotropes: diamond and graphite. The term allotropes may also be used to refer to the molecular forms of an element; such as, a diatomic gas, even if there is only...
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allotropy

Allotropy is the existence of an element in two or more forms, known as allotropes, in the same state (solid, liquid, or gas). The physical properties (color, crystalline form if solid, density, etc.) may differ widely, but identical chemical compounds can be formed from the various allotropes of th...
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allotropy

allotropy (ulo'trupē) [Gr.,=other form]. A chemical element is said to exhibit allotropy when it occurs in two or more forms in the same physical state; the forms are called allotropes. Allotropes generally differ in physical properties such as color and hardness; they may also differ in m...
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Allotropy

Allotropy (from the Greek allos, other and tropos, habit), is a term used to express the fact that one and the same element may exist in different forms, differing widely in external physical properties. Thus, carbon occurs as the diamond, and as charcoal and plumbago, and is therefore regarded as a substance subject to allotropy.
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allotropy

Property whereby an element can exist in two or more forms (allotropes), each possessing different physical properties but the same state of matter (gas, liquid, or solid). The allotropes of carbon are diamond, fullerene, and graphite. Sulphur has several allotropes (flowers of sulphur, plastic, rhom...
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Allotropy

Allotropy or allotropism ({ety|gre|ἄλλος (allos)|other||τρόπος (tropos)|manner, form}) is the property of some chemical elements to exist in two or more different forms, known as allotropes of these elements. Allotropes are different structural modifications of an element; the atoms of the element are bonded together in a different man...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allotropy

allotropy

of an element, having more than one form
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